Posts Tagged ‘midnight party

13
Nov
08

November 13, 2008

Well, the Games Party was loads of fun – we had 33 attendees – the one who traveled furthest came from Georgia! We polished off 5-1/2 half-gallons of ice cream, two cans of whipping cream, a giant bag of Doritos, one of Ruffles, one of Fritos, two types of dip, a meat/cheese platter, most of a veggie platter, two bottles of champagne, two punch-bowls-full of Nuclear Punch, a case of beer, a bottle of wine, half a case of sparkling water, and 2 cases of soda.

And we played some games.

A new one that had never hit the party before was “Man Bites Dog”. Neither Brian nor I had the chance to play it that night, but we played it the next day, and it was a blast. Cards with words or short phrases are dealt to each player, and each person tries to make a headline using up to 5 cards. So we came up with some hilarious ones like “Blind Teen Angel Shoots Cop”, and “Angry Tourist Hits Naked Model”.

Another new one was “Pass the Popcorn”, which is a movie trivia game. It was fun, although I’m not really up on movies, so I was surprised at how well I did. Lots of other games were played – Quiddler, Taboo, Munchkin Fu, Boggle, and many others; and of course, we played Midnight Party (quite a while after midnight, however). We slept in on Sunday, went out to brunch with a friend, and lazed around the house for the rest of the afternoon – except for when the neighbor boy came by to ask if Robin could play – they went out and ran around the back yard. I think we have the only Shetland Sheepdog whose idea of a game is to *be* chased, rather than do the chasing. If we ever get him out to the farm again, he’s going to be sadly disappointed that the sheep don’t want to chase him. . .

I am down to only 10 more radiation treatments to go – yay!!! Even now, the worst thing I’ve got going is the radiation burns. Not only do I have them on my front and under my left arm, but because the beam that is treating the sub-clavicular lymph nodes is directly overhead, I have radiation burns on the back of my left shoulder from the radiation exiting my body. How scary is that?

Yesterday I met with the radiation oncologist, and when she saw my burns, she decided it was time to switch to the electron boost on the lumpectomy scar and give the rest of the tissue a little break. This morning was my first boost, and it is pretty much the same as the radiation treatment, just at a different angle. Because they can regulate how deep the electron beam goes, they can position the beam directly above the breast without fear that it will go deep enough to enter your chest cavity and damage your lungs or heart. I’ll have 5 boost treatments, and then finish up with another 6 regular radiation treatments. My last treatment will be the day after Thanksgiving.

Also yesterday, I had a chest x-ray and a follow-up appointment with the pulmonary specialist to find out the status of my sarcoidosis. Guess what? It was all gone, just as if it had never been there. I’m still convinced that the Ambien CR was the cause, but the doctors don’t believe it. They rightly point out that Ambien has exactly the same set of adverse reactions listed, and I’ve never had a problem with plain Ambien. My opinion is that the reason the CR is a problem is because I’m also on Nexium to control my GERD, which reduces my stomach acid to nearly nothing. With Ambien CR, I suspect that the lack of stomach acid means that I didn’t metabolize the Ambien at the “proper” rate that someone with a normal complement of stomach acid would, and that it was essentially causing an overdose. Three days after I stopped taking the Ambien CR, my symptoms were much better; and a week after that, I had basically no symptoms. However, since I’m not going to try taking Ambien CR to recreate the problem just to prove my theory, we’ll probably never know.

When the doctor told me the sarcoidosis was gone, I let out a breath I didn’t know I’d been holding. In spite of having two biopsies that were negative for cancer, I was apparently still worried about it.

And next week, I meet with the oncologist to determine the chemo treatment plan – when, and how many. I basically know the what, unless he’s come up with an alternative: Taxol. I’ll be glad to have the plan – having a goal date to look forward to is very helpful. I’ve been crossing off each date on my calendar after I finish another radiation treatment, and it helps my attitude when I see that I’ve finished more than two-thirds of the treatments.

Next up on the calendar is Thanksgiving – we’re spending it with our good friends Sharon and Gary and their family – they’re awfully good to us!

29
Oct
08

October 29, 2008

I’ve been dilatory in posting – my apologies.

Radiation is just over a third done. I’ve had 12 treatments out of 33, and up until yesterday evening, I haven’t really had any side-effects. I started feeling a little bit itchy, and when I got ready for bed, I saw that I’d developed a mild “sunburn”. I told Brian that I had a modified trucker’s tan.

The radiation oncologist had me start using aloe vera gel right from the start, but I’d only been using it once a day, and now she wants me to use it twice a day. Based on the itch factor, I think I’m going to use it three times a day.

One of the potential side effects of having lymph nodes removed so near the arm is that you can develop lymphedema – the lymph fluid collects in your arm because it doesn’t have as clear a path to get back out. Lymph fluid carries proteins, foreign materials, and cell detritus through the lymph system and the lymph nodes filter out the detritus – the fluid then passes back into the blood (this is a very simplified layman’s description – please don’t sic the Accuracy Police on me!).

When just the sentinel nodes are removed (i.e., the first three lymph nodes that carry fluid out of the breast), the risk of developing lymphedema is very small. Radiation increases the chances of it occuring, so the radiation oncologist sends all her patients to consult with a physical therapist to learn how to prevent it, how to recognize the symptoms, and if necessary, to treat it. I checked with my favorite physical therapist, and sadly no-one in his office does lymphedema-related work, but he referred me to one of his colleagues who does. I met with her last week, and she was impressed at how well I’ve healed after all the surgeries, and at the range of motion I have. After teaching me some stretches to help with muscles that have tightened from the surgeries and thus potentially could raise my chances of getting lymphedema, she measured me for a compression sleeve. I asked why I needed a compression sleeve now, since I had no sign of lymphedema, and she said it needed to be fitted when I was a normal size, so that if I *do* get it, they don’t have to guess by measuring the unaffected arm. OK, so I’ll have a compression sleeve that I hope never to need.

Let’s see – I don’t really think there’s anything else to mention, since mostly I have very long days going to radiation, commuting to work, working, commuting home, and not much else. Tomorrow night I am going to my beading group, and we’re making earrings to donate as Christmas gifts for soldiers in Iraq – there’s a group we’re donating through, but I don’t have the details yet. BTW, as far as I know, the intent is earrings for *female* soldiers, although I suppose they could really be for whoever wants some.

Oh yeah – we’re having our annual Games Party on November 8 – 26th Annual! I’m looking forward to it, although I suspect I’ll want a nap that afternoon to make sure I’m up for Midnight Party ;-}




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