14
May
10

My Least Favorite Rollercoaster

Well, one of the topics we discussed with Dr. Medici on Monday was progress scans on the chemo regimen. He said that it had been nearly 8 weeks, and since we were rescheduling the chemo, why not do them this week?

I was floored, as I understood that scans happened every 3 months – Brian was under that impression also, but he said he remembered hearing 2 months originally, but then everything he heard after that was 3 months.

Apparently we were so shell-shocked in the first meeting with Dr. Medici, just finding out that the tumors were indeed cancer, that what we missed/got confused about is that with a new chemo regimen scans are performed at 2 months, and then each succeeding 3 months as long as you’re on that regimen. And once you switch to a different chemo regimen, you have a scan at 2 months, then each succeeding 3 months. The tricky part is if the 2-month scan shows that the disease is progressing, you get switched to a new regimen, so you’ll have a scan in another 2 months.

At any rate, I jumped at the chance to have scans 4 weeks earlier than I was expecting, because the waiting is the hardest part (how petty of me ;-} ). So I had a scan on Thursday morning early.

Late Tuesday afternoon, his nurse called with the results of my CA 15-3 tumor marker blood test results: the number was down by nearly half – excellent news, yes?

Maybe. There isn’t a specific correlation between the amount of tumor marker in the blood and the size of tumors that is true for every person. For instance, when I had my recurrence, I had a tumor that was a little larger than the largest of the original tumors, and my CA 15-3 was somewhere around 9 or so. We did not check my tumor marker with the first set of tumors, since I had the surgery before I ever met with the oncologist, so I can’t say what it was at that time. But 9 is a perfectly acceptable “normal” level, one that an oncologist would expect means there is no tumor.

My prior tumor marker level at my latest oncology followup was 10 (I believe that was in July, but it might have been November, I’ve lost track of specific dates). And when we measured it at the time of diagnosis in March this year, it had soared to 1622. Knowing that there’s at least 1 tumor of nearly 4 inches diameter, other, smaller tumors, and multiple lesions on the liver, that seems to indicate aggressive growth in a short timespan.

But does the halving of the tumor marker mean that the tumors themselves will be halved in size? Probably not, although it is likely a good indication that the chemo is having some effect on the cancer. Dr. Medici says once we get a few scans and tumor-marker measurements, we should be able to figure out *my* personal marker-level-to-tumor-size correlation. It would be awesome if it was 1:1.

So why the rollercoaster?

I’m still adjusting to the idea that I have a terminal disease, which is pretty depressing.

Yet the hope that springs up when I’m told that the tumor marker is down is hard to repress. If we knew what that *meant*, it might be that I have every reason to hope that there has been significant progress; it also might be that it only means that the chemo is good at killing off the tumor markers in my blood, but not good at killing off tissue-bound tumors.

But of course, statistics don’t lie. It’s just that you never know where your position in the stat table is, until something actually happens.

So I’m trying to maintain a balance between hope and statistics – it’s a thin line, and it’s hard to keep your footing.

We’ll find out Monday what the results of the scan are, and there’s 2 out of 3 chances that I’ll remain on my current regimen – if there is progress in shrinking the tumors, or if there is no change in the size, I’ll continue as is; but if there is growth, we’ll be switching me to a new regimen.

Dr. Medici will hopefully have the results soon enough this afternoon to be able to make that decision, because if I’m continuing the same regimen, I will have chemo on Monday. If it’s changing, I’ll have chemo Monday only if he is able to get the new drug in on time.

Hate it or hate it, you gotta love chemo when your life depends on it. . .

Advertisements

0 Responses to “My Least Favorite Rollercoaster”



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Post archive

May 2010
S M T W T F S
« Apr   Jun »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 33 other followers


%d bloggers like this: