Archive for April 5th, 2010

05
Apr
10

Everybody loves irony . . .

. . . except when it happens to them.

Last fall, everything was falling into place – Brian and I were having lots of fun and were more in love than ever (just so you know, this isn’t the irony part – we still are more in love than ever); work was going great and I was starting on some really fun projects; we took one of the best vacations we’ve ever had, and spent it with two of our most favorite people.

Sure, there were little blips, but isn’t life always like that? Even when nearly everything is perfect, there’s always something to remind you how grateful you are for your good life.

We had a wonderful Christmas, with my company extending our vacation policy to include all the days between Christmas and New Year, so I was rested and ready to come back to work. I put on the company Winter Party, and people seemed to have a good time (plus the caterer’s food was fabulous as usual ;-} ).

I started taking mandolin lessons in January, because I’d always wanted to, and it seemed like now was the right time. And it turns out that I’m somewhat of a natural, although probably partly because of my piano days, and existing familiarity with music.

Also in January, Brian moved the “Julie – Breast Cancer” medical file out of the active file cabinet into a box in the garage.

It is fairly reasonable to say that these were the happiest days of our lives so far.

On January 5, I finally ordered the book “The Happiest Days of Our Lives” by Wil Wheaton. I’d planned on ordering it before, except there’d been some long publishing delays; but word was that it was going to be shipping very soon. Yay! Order that puppy, because it is right in tune with where my life is, and I’m always up for more good stuff!

It arrived on March 26th, the day I had my first chemotherapy for my Stage IV breast cancer.

(In case anyone is unsure, that is the ironic part).

So my mission, and I *do* choose to accept it, is to convert this back from irony to truth. While one doesn’t have to be happy at having a terminal disease, one can live their life as if it doesn’t matter if they have a terminal disease. This doesn’t mean I’m going to do all the traveling I’ve always wanted to do, or write the Great American Novel, or win the Nobel Peace prize. It does mean that, with help from all the loving friends and family who are there for me, who call, write, e-mail, post comments, or even just pray or send positive thoughts and energy my way, these can still be the happiest days of my life; and hopefully Brian’s, also.

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