13
Nov
08

November 13, 2008

Well, the Games Party was loads of fun – we had 33 attendees – the one who traveled furthest came from Georgia! We polished off 5-1/2 half-gallons of ice cream, two cans of whipping cream, a giant bag of Doritos, one of Ruffles, one of Fritos, two types of dip, a meat/cheese platter, most of a veggie platter, two bottles of champagne, two punch-bowls-full of Nuclear Punch, a case of beer, a bottle of wine, half a case of sparkling water, and 2 cases of soda.

And we played some games.

A new one that had never hit the party before was “Man Bites Dog”. Neither Brian nor I had the chance to play it that night, but we played it the next day, and it was a blast. Cards with words or short phrases are dealt to each player, and each person tries to make a headline using up to 5 cards. So we came up with some hilarious ones like “Blind Teen Angel Shoots Cop”, and “Angry Tourist Hits Naked Model”.

Another new one was “Pass the Popcorn”, which is a movie trivia game. It was fun, although I’m not really up on movies, so I was surprised at how well I did. Lots of other games were played – Quiddler, Taboo, Munchkin Fu, Boggle, and many others; and of course, we played Midnight Party (quite a while after midnight, however). We slept in on Sunday, went out to brunch with a friend, and lazed around the house for the rest of the afternoon – except for when the neighbor boy came by to ask if Robin could play – they went out and ran around the back yard. I think we have the only Shetland Sheepdog whose idea of a game is to *be* chased, rather than do the chasing. If we ever get him out to the farm again, he’s going to be sadly disappointed that the sheep don’t want to chase him. . .

I am down to only 10 more radiation treatments to go – yay!!! Even now, the worst thing I’ve got going is the radiation burns. Not only do I have them on my front and under my left arm, but because the beam that is treating the sub-clavicular lymph nodes is directly overhead, I have radiation burns on the back of my left shoulder from the radiation exiting my body. How scary is that?

Yesterday I met with the radiation oncologist, and when she saw my burns, she decided it was time to switch to the electron boost on the lumpectomy scar and give the rest of the tissue a little break. This morning was my first boost, and it is pretty much the same as the radiation treatment, just at a different angle. Because they can regulate how deep the electron beam goes, they can position the beam directly above the breast without fear that it will go deep enough to enter your chest cavity and damage your lungs or heart. I’ll have 5 boost treatments, and then finish up with another 6 regular radiation treatments. My last treatment will be the day after Thanksgiving.

Also yesterday, I had a chest x-ray and a follow-up appointment with the pulmonary specialist to find out the status of my sarcoidosis. Guess what? It was all gone, just as if it had never been there. I’m still convinced that the Ambien CR was the cause, but the doctors don’t believe it. They rightly point out that Ambien has exactly the same set of adverse reactions listed, and I’ve never had a problem with plain Ambien. My opinion is that the reason the CR is a problem is because I’m also on Nexium to control my GERD, which reduces my stomach acid to nearly nothing. With Ambien CR, I suspect that the lack of stomach acid means that I didn’t metabolize the Ambien at the “proper” rate that someone with a normal complement of stomach acid would, and that it was essentially causing an overdose. Three days after I stopped taking the Ambien CR, my symptoms were much better; and a week after that, I had basically no symptoms. However, since I’m not going to try taking Ambien CR to recreate the problem just to prove my theory, we’ll probably never know.

When the doctor told me the sarcoidosis was gone, I let out a breath I didn’t know I’d been holding. In spite of having two biopsies that were negative for cancer, I was apparently still worried about it.

And next week, I meet with the oncologist to determine the chemo treatment plan – when, and how many. I basically know the what, unless he’s come up with an alternative: Taxol. I’ll be glad to have the plan – having a goal date to look forward to is very helpful. I’ve been crossing off each date on my calendar after I finish another radiation treatment, and it helps my attitude when I see that I’ve finished more than two-thirds of the treatments.

Next up on the calendar is Thanksgiving – we’re spending it with our good friends Sharon and Gary and their family – they’re awfully good to us!

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